Sugar Town

repobsession:

lizzysam:

theylooklikebigstronghands:

The waterproof planetarium floats in water and contains a bright light that projects out into the room, or even into the tub itself when flipped over. It also includes Rose Bath and Deep Ocean graphic domes for changing to a different mood.

WANT WANT WANT! 

Oh my gods, I could bathe among the stars.. 

repobsession:

lizzysam:

theylooklikebigstronghands:

The waterproof planetarium floats in water and contains a bright light that projects out into the room, or even into the tub itself when flipped over. It also includes Rose Bath and Deep Ocean graphic domes for changing to a different mood.

WANT WANT WANT! 

Oh my gods, I could bathe among the stars.. 

(Source: ianbrooks, via sagihairius)

— 1 week ago with 128272 notes
"Like a magpie, I am a scavenger of shiny things: fairy tales, dead languages, weird folk beliefs, fascinating religions, and more."
Laini Taylor, Lips Touch: Three Times (via moriartysdance)

(via inkytomes)

— 1 week ago with 2593 notes
gamercrunch:

Economic stability level: Elder Scrolls

gamercrunch:

Economic stability level: Elder Scrolls

— 1 week ago with 12 notes

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

(via mintike)

— 1 week ago with 132608 notes
darkthoughtsdarkdeeds:

failsnet:

Tumblr Fails.net - Sugar Skull Spoon

I want this because of reasons

darkthoughtsdarkdeeds:

failsnet:

Tumblr Fails.net - Sugar Skull Spoon

I want this because of reasons

(via mordsithcara)

— 2 weeks ago with 104 notes
a-cidlife:

follow me on Instagram @jadecbradshaw & like some of my photos(I’ll do the same to you if you’re off private)

a-cidlife:

follow me on Instagram @jadecbradshaw & like some of my photos
(I’ll do the same to you if you’re off private)

(Source: wildfoxwithowleyes, via ijustwantnotes)

— 2 weeks ago with 47846 notes
"One of the ways that people justify oppressing people of any alternative gender or sexuality is by saying the social norm is natural. That is, it originates in the authority of Nature itself. In other words it comes from God, an authority to which there is no appeal. All this is, in fact, a complete fabrication, a construction. There is no “natural” sex, because “sex” itself as a medical or cultural category is nothing more than the momentary outcome of battles over who owns the meanings of the category. There is a great deal wider variation in genetics than most people except geneticists realize, but we make that invisible through language. The way we make it invisible through language is by having no words for anything except male or female. One of the ways our culture erases people is by not having any words for them. That does it absolutely. When there’s nothing to describe you, you are effectively invisible."
— 2 weeks ago with 1507 notes
"If you’re a woman and you don’t wear enough make-up, there’s about an 85% chance that the first person you see when you leave the house will ask if you’re tired or sick…
Conversely, if some dude’s inbuilt conceal-o-meter scans your eyeliner as a millimetre thicker than the Department of Warpaint’s cat eye regulations, you’re likely to be charged with five counts of Offences Against Natural Beauty…
Part of this phenomenon is that a lot of people, and almost all men, don’t understand how make-up works. Make-up was, and still is to a large extent, one of those private self-maintenance tasks ladies perform out of male view, because putting it on openly fucks with the illusion it’s supposed to create. Traditional make-up - and especially ‘no make-up make-up’ - is supposed to make your face look ‘naturally beautiful’…
Sponging on the foundation where dudes can see messes with men’s suspension of disbelief and can even cause anger, confusion or disgust. You tricked me!, he thinks. I thought you were a natural beauty! Now I see [it was] an illusion… “If I know she wears make-up,” muses the dude, “maybe she burps and farts as well. That’s not hot at all, and women are supposed to be hot…”
Wearing ‘too much’ make-up also renders the make-up itself visible, rather than contributing to the impression of a woman’s inbuilt, effortless fuckability. It’s often connected to unbecoming displays of overt sexuality: … ‘that heavy eye shadow makes you look like a whore’…
This does open up the enticing possibility of using make-up in rebellious ways, though - playing with colour and glitter or doing a hot pink lip can make you look fantastic and repel men who expect more subtlety in make-up practice. Or you could take a more direct approach, like writing IT’S NOT FOR YOU across your cheek in green shimmer eyeliner. You go girl."
Eleanor Robertson, "All Made Up" (via crystalcabinet)

(Source: ollymurmaid, via doctorbee)

— 2 weeks ago with 24736 notes